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14 rows where day = "May 9 2019" and room = "Main Sanctuary" sorted by abstract

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Link rowid title speaker time day room url datetime abstract ▼ image
32 Warm Breakfast Buffet / Espresso Cart / Hangout time   9:00 AM May 9 2019 Main Sanctuary   2019-05-09T09:00:00    
33 KEYNOTE Teon L. Brooks 10:00 AM May 9 2019 Main Sanctuary   2019-05-09T10:00:00    
40 Lunch in Fuller Hall   12:00 PM May 9 2019 Main Sanctuary   2019-05-09T12:00:00    
41 KEYNOTE Kirstie Whitaker 12:30 PM May 9 2019 Main Sanctuary   2019-05-09T12:30:00    
42 Lightning Talks in The Main Sanctuary   1:30 PM May 9 2019 Main Sanctuary   2019-05-09T13:30:00    
49 Break   3:00 PM May 9 2019 Main Sanctuary   2019-05-09T15:00:00    
56 Outros/Goodbye in Main Sanctuary   4:30 PM May 9 2019 Main Sanctuary   2019-05-09T16:30:00    
57 5-6pm Hangout time   5:00 PM May 9 2019 Main Sanctuary   2019-05-09T17:00:00    
46 Beyond the WARC: Making Web Archives More Useful and User-friendly Ilya Kreymer 2:30 PM May 9 2019 Main Sanctuary https://csvconf.com/speakers/#ilya-kreymer 2019-05-09T14:30:00 Archives of the web contain not only web pages but any type of data. The only standard in web archiving is the ISO WARC file format, which specifies raw data captured from the web. However, the WARC files often lack any context or metadata about how this data was captured. The talk will briefly cover the basics of the WARC format, and also provide possible ideas for making web archiving data more user-friendly, present existing tools and suggest ideas for interoperable ways to describe collections and make sense of growing web archive data beyond the WARC format. https://csvconf.com/img/speakers-2019/ikreymer.jpg
43 Data Science Training and Community Building through Hackweeks Micaela Parker 2:00 PM May 9 2019 Main Sanctuary https://csvconf.com/speakers/#micaela-parker 2019-05-09T14:00:00 Informal training activities enable researchers at all levels to rapidly learn data science tools and best practices that fit their research questions and make significant advances in their work. In this talk, I will describe a highly successful informal training that has emerged in recent years called Hackweeks. These hackathon-style events place a strong focus on cultivating data science literacy, building a community of practice, and developing resources within an existing domain-specific community. By bringing together researchers from many different universities to address methods challenges within a research domain, Hackweeks take advantage of a shared language and shared scientific objectives. The Hackweek structure is designed to foster collaboration and learning among people from various stages of their career and technical abilities, and catalyze a community through a shared interest in solving computational challenges within a field (Huppenkothen et al, 2018). Hackweeks originally came out of the Astronomy community (Astro Hack Week, entering its 6th year in 2019) and the model has been successfully propagated to: neuroscience (Neurohackweek, now a 2-week NIH-funded program called Neurohackademy), geospatial sciences (Geohackweek), oceanography (Oceanhackweek), and more. https://csvconf.com/img/speakers-2019/mparker.jpg
37 Improving the Quality of Neuroimaging Scans Jonathan Uriarte-Lopez 11:30 AM May 9 2019 Main Sanctuary https://csvconf.com/speakers/#jonathan-uriarte-lopez 2019-05-09T11:30:00 My presentation will be on how adjustments to the human connectome project (HCP) pipeline, with the use of the advanced normalization tools (ANTS), improved the data quality of neuroimaging scans provided by the Autism Brain Imaging Data Exchange (ABIDE). Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder consisting of altered social and communication difficulties along with repetitive and restrictive behaviors. It is difficult to study a living brain safely which is why we use neuroimaging techniques such as MRI. Data quality can be affected by subjects moving in the scanner, or due to computing pipeline issues. Adjustments to the HCP pipeline lead to an increase in data quality, and a decrease in the amount of data lost. This will save researchers time, money, and data to study the neurophysiological aspects of ASD. https://csvconf.com/img/speakers-2019/julopez.jpg
34 Open Infrastructure for Open Science: How Binder Powers an Open Stack in the Cloud Chris Holdgraf 11:00 AM May 9 2019 Main Sanctuary https://csvconf.com/speakers/#chris-holdgraf 2019-05-09T11:00:00 This talk will discuss the Binder Project in the context of open data and open science, two primary use-cases that have driven the project. It will cover the basics of the Binder Project, such as how to define a reproducible repository to share with others. It will then discuss one of Binder's core goals, which is to build on open standards to facilitate the use of *many* open languages, interfaces, etc. Finally I'll discuss how BinderHub, the technology behind a Binder deployment, is itself open source and deployable anywhere. I'll finish by describing a goal of distributed, federated BinderHubs that provide a network of reproducible data analytics environments. https://csvconf.com/img/speakers-2019/choldgraf.jpg
50 A Love Letter to the Boxplot Melissa Santos 3:30 PM May 9 2019 Main Sanctuary https://csvconf.com/speakers/#melissa-santos 2019-05-09T15:30:00 We'll briefly cover what the boxplot is, why it's so great to look at distributions instead of single statistics, and common boxplot variations. I'll spend at least half the talk showing boxplots of real data and comparing them to other summary methods. The talk will wrap up with some quick info on how to create boxplots in many common chartings/statistics/BI tools. I hope this talk will make people more likely to use my favorite chart! https://csvconf.com/img/speakers-2019/msantos.jpg
53 Spanking and Spreadsheets: Data-driven Sex Journalism Jacqueline Nolis & Heather Nolis 4:00 PM May 9 2019 Main Sanctuary https://csvconf.com/speakers/#jacqueline-nolis-heather-nolis 2019-05-09T16:00:00 When we saw that the Stranger, Seattle’s alternative newspaper, was running a survey on kinks and sexual preferences, we knew we had to get our hands on the data. We convinced the that using machine learning methods on the responses would be a good idea, and then we quickly set out to analyzing them. But we had never written an article for a newspaper before—nor had we worked with data even remotely as dirty. It turns out what makes for a good blog post or technical journal is very different than writing for print, especially for such a sensitive topic. In this talk we will cover how we made sense of the lewd data, the statistical methods we used (and failures we produced), as well as the final results that ended up in our feature article: “There Are Four Kinds of Sex Partners (which one are you).” https://csvconf.com/img/speakers-2019/jnolis_hnolis.jpg

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CREATE TABLE [talks] (
   [title] TEXT,
   [speaker] TEXT,
   [time] TEXT,
   [day] TEXT,
   [room] TEXT,
   [url] TEXT,
   [datetime] TEXT,
   [abstract] TEXT,
   [image] TEXT
)
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