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Link rowid title speaker time day room url datetime abstract image
4 Digging for Urban and Civic Data in Eastern Europe Gleb Kanunnikau 10:30 AM May 8 2019 Fuller Hall https://csvconf.com/speakers/#gleb-kanunnikau 2019-05-08T10:30:00 The Open Data and Open Knowledge movement in developing countries is constantly bumping against the paradoxical question: is there a way to open up data when the datasets aren't yet present? Where do you get the data to make your effort worthwhile and how do you scale to make the initiative relevant to the larger society? More importantly, do the data producers (the state bodies and the surveillance apparatus, social networks or municipal service providers) share the interest of publishing data for everyone's and society's benefit? Is there a way to dig out interesting and relevant datasets that people didn't know existed to show new ways to analyze and fight urban problems, educate people about the environment, propose solutions to post-Soviet problems like unemployment, decaying public infrastructure, never-digitized cultural assets? Do we cooperate with the fashionable "Smart city" projects funded by Chinese state corporations or remain vary of the surveillance methods they introduce in cooperation with the police and other government structure? Practical cases, civic hacking and citizen data science, establishing cooperation between unlikely partners and other questions of interest for anyone interested in the community building process from scratch. https://csvconf.com/img/speakers-2019/gkanunnikau.jpg
7 Let’s ROR together - building open research organization identifiers Maria Gould 11:00 AM May 8 2019 Fuller Hall https://csvconf.com/speakers/#maria-gould 2019-05-08T11:00:00   https://csvconf.com/img/speakers-2019/comma.jpg
10 Project Athena: Mapping African Militaries for Good John Stupart 11:30 AM May 8 2019 Fuller Hall https://csvconf.com/speakers/#john-stupart 2019-05-08T11:30:00 I will discuss ADR's project aimed at creating a database mapping out, literally, where each and every significant item in a country's military is. Tanks, planes, barracks and the like are being categorised and placed in our custom-made "Athena" database. Aimed at pulling open the lid on arms flows into Africa, Athena is suited for journalists and those in the humanitarian or academic field alike working in anti-corruption and transparency as it pertains to defence and military affairs. https://csvconf.com/img/speakers-2019/jstupart.jpg
15 Lessons Learned: Creating Space for Inclusive Practices in Academia Antoinette Foster & Lucille Moore 1:30 PM May 8 2019 Fuller Hall https://csvconf.com/speakers/#antoinette-foster-lucille-moore 2019-05-08T13:30:00 With the advent of big data, many people are beginning to explore fighting social inequity and structural systems of oppression with data in order to (1) define the problem and (2) affect changes in policy. We are learning that, for the most part, much of the data around these issues don’t exist, which largely reinforces systems of oppression. At Oregon Health & Science University in Portland, OR, a group of people have come together to focus on the lack of representation of historically underrepresented minorities (URM) in science as well as the lack of inclusive culture within OHSU’s graduate programs. Our group is called the Alliance for Visible Diversity in Science (AVDS). We found that data on a variety of topics, e.g. statistics on the number of URM graduate students that are interviewed/accepted/decide to matriculate, and well-designed climate surveys to assess the culture of inclusivity are lacking. This leads to decision-making and policies based on incomplete data that disproportionately hurts already vulnerable populations. For example, many programs require that applicants report their score on a standardized test called the graduate record examination (GRE) despite the fact that research shows that GRE scores are more highly correlated with socioeconomic status than student success. We would like to share what we have learned through the process of forming AVDS: our successes, our challenges, and the imperative idea that we must in part approach social inequity issues with scientific and data-driven approaches. https://csvconf.com/img/speakers-2019/afoster_lmoore.jpg
18 Data Analysis to Improve Diversity and Equity in Graduate-Level Education Rachel Mallinga 2:00 PM May 8 2019 Fuller Hall https://csvconf.com/speakers/#rachel-mallinga 2019-05-08T14:00:00 This project grew from the need to determine what students of diverse backgrounds need to feel welcomed and represented in their graduate department at the University of Oregon. Two women of color took the initiative to conduct qualitative and quantitative research on how equity and diversity are represented in curriculum, services, and departmental resources. Based on our findings we researched resources on campus that address the problems identified in our data and best practices for graduate education implemented by similar graduate-level programs in Oregon. This talk illustrates how research methods can be used to inform institutional policies and practices to improve diversity and equity. https://csvconf.com/img/speakers-2019/rmallinga.jpg
21 Using Research and Technology to Tackle Gender Bias Mollie Marr 2:30 PM May 8 2019 Fuller Hall https://csvconf.com/speakers/#mollie-marr 2019-05-08T14:30:00 Qualitative and mixed methods research studies have provided insight into the language and patterns associated with unconscious bias across multiple fields. These patterns can be converted to rules for NLP and other text analysis programs making it possible to identify bias within a written document. This talk will explore one approach using qualitative research in gender bias and letters of recommendation and evaluation to define rules for a web-based automated text analysis program using NLP. The role of research and technology in addressing structural issues such as bias will be discussed and participants will be encouraged to think about ways in which existing research might be used to inspire new solutions to social problems. https://csvconf.com/img/speakers-2019/mmarr.jpg
25 Building Communities of Practice around Environmental Open Data Science Julia Lowndes 3:30 PM May 8 2019 Fuller Hall https://csvconf.com/speakers/#julia-lowndes 2019-05-08T15:30:00 Environmental scientists are a diverse community that ranges from climatologists to geneticists, but we are united by an enormous need to work efficiently with data – and by the fact that we seldom have formal computing or data analysis training of any kind. There is great opportunity to borrow from the work of software engineers and use collaborative open tools that facilitate better science in less time. However, a fundamental shift is needed in the environmental science community that prioritizes data science and provides emerging scientific leaders training in open science tools and practices to strengthen and accelerate their work. I will discuss my work to catalyze this shift through two programs I have developed and lead at the National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis (NCEAS) at the University of California at Santa Barbara. The first is the Ocean Health Index training program, which teaches international government and academic scientists how to channel the best available scientific information into marine policy using our scientific method and tools. And the second I have recently launched in January 2019 as a Mozilla Fellow: Openscapes, a mentorship program that empowers environmental scientists with open data science tools and grows the community of practice. https://csvconf.com/img/speakers-2019/jlowndes.jpg
28 Where Has Your Data Come From? Data Ancestry and Other Tales Dr. Tania Allard 4:00 PM May 8 2019 Fuller Hall https://csvconf.com/speakers/#dr-tania-allard 2019-05-08T16:00:00 Over the last few years, great improvements have been made around the areas of reproducible scientific computing research and FAIR (findable, accessible, interoperable and reusable) data. As a consequence, data scientists and researchers alike have started to incorporate modern software development practices in their workflows (i.e. version control, testing). More and more emphasis has been made on the need to look after the quality and validity of the software developed. But what about the data? Data validation and integrity is just as important as the adequacy of the code ingesting and processing the datasets. In this talk, I will take a high-level look at concepts such as data lineage, provenance, continuous data validation and present real-world examples in which these concepts have been applied to different real-world data pipelines increasing not only the confidence of the results obtained but also the efficiency and integrity of the workflows themselves. https://csvconf.com/img/speakers-2019/tallard.jpg
35 The Data to Policy Project: Using Data to Build More Equitable Communities Melissa Mejia 11:00 AM May 9 2019 Fuller Hall https://csvconf.com/speakers/#melissa-mejia 2019-05-09T11:00:00 The Data to Policy Project (D2P) is an initiative creating meaningful learning experiences for students by using analysis of open data to generate equity and evidence-based policy proposals addressing local community needs. D2P is integrated into credit-bearing courses where students explore issues like policing and affordable housing in the Denver region. Over the course of a semester, students find, cite, clean, analyze, and visualize data to identify gaps or problems in policing or affordable housing, create policy proposals that address what they found, then create a research poster to communicate their findings. We encourage a critical approach to data literacy that questions the objectivity and neutrality of data and situate it in a socio-political context. The project culminates in a D2P Symposium where students present their research to their peers, faculty, staff, and community members. By focusing on student-initiated concerns and using real data to try and address them, D2P forms a connection between the courses students take and the communities they live in, increasing its meaning and impact. We also partner with local community organizations, governments, and nonprofits to identify and frame the research questions students explore. Our goal is to intentionally include community voices so that the research we work on is relevant, context-specific, and in the interest of the community it will impact. This presentation will communicate the challenges and benefits of this kind of work, how it can be replicated in other contexts, and invite feedback on how to improve the project. https://csvconf.com/img/speakers-2019/mmejia.jpg
38 Preparing Clients for Open Source Contributions Aaron Couch 11:30 AM May 9 2019 Fuller Hall https://csvconf.com/speakers/#aaron-couch 2019-05-09T11:30:00 At CivicActions we've developed a number of methodologies to help enable our clients to be a part of the open source community. This talk will focus on a number of those strategies including capture management, project roles and tools, and reporting measures. This talk will be slightly shorter to allow for time for a more collaborative discussion. https://csvconf.com/img/speakers-2019/acouch.jpg
44 Crafting Data-Driven Stories for the Everyday Reader Marisa Aquilina 2:00 PM May 9 2019 Fuller Hall https://csvconf.com/speakers/#marisa-aquilina 2019-05-09T14:00:00 Journalists don’t write for other journalists—they write for the curious and community-minded public. In the same way, statistical journalism should not be a black box of visualizations and narrative meant only for data makers like us. Crafting data-driven stories for a general audience means giving readers an opportunity to interact with a fun and practical use case while explaining the interpretative thinking that lies under the hood of statistical methods. I am an undergraduate at Cal Poly that writes and builds interactive, data-driven publishings with a team of students. I'll walk you through how we ideate fascinating questions, make methods explainable, and use Jupyter Notebooks to share reproducible code. https://csvconf.com/img/speakers-2019/maquilina.jpg
47 How a File Format Led to a Crossword Scandal Saul Pwanson 2:30 PM May 9 2019 Fuller Hall https://csvconf.com/speakers/#saul-pwanson 2019-05-09T14:30:00 In 2016 I designed a plain-text file format for crossword puzzle data, and then spent a couple of months building a micro-data-pipeline, scraping tens of thousands of crosswords from various sources. Then, having all those crosswords in a simple format, I wanted to see if there were any common grid patterns--and discovered egregious plagiarism by a major crossword editor that had gone on for years. This talk would cover the file format, data pipeline, and the design choices that aided rapid exploration; the evidence for the scandal, from the initial anomalies to the final damning visualization; and what it's like for a data project to get 15 minutes of fame. https://csvconf.com/img/speakers-2019/spwanson.jpg
51 Squishy Amoeba-Like Objects Darius Kazemi 3:30 PM May 9 2019 Fuller Hall https://csvconf.com/speakers/#darius-kazemi 2019-05-09T15:30:00 On June 19th, 1970, a group of computer scientists who were inventing the internet referred to key pieces of its proposed design as "squishy amoeba-like objects". Amoebas are porous yet have well-defined boundaries. Thinking about these creatures gives us new ways to think about networks and communities and technology. This talk makes a case for the squishy amoeba-like object as an organizing principle for what is broadly being called "the decentralized web", a web outside of monolithic, monopolistic actors. https://csvconf.com/img/speakers-2019/dkazemi.jpg
54 Annotations in the Classroom; The Classroom in Annotations Asura Enkhbayar 4:00 PM May 9 2019 Fuller Hall https://csvconf.com/speakers/#asura-enkhbayar 2019-05-09T16:00:00 In this talk I want to explore the impact of using Hypothesis in the classroom. What does it mean to read, think, and annotate publicly? How does it change your learning experience as a student? How do you evaluate and assess different annotation styles as a teacher? As a student I can share my own experience of this new mode of teaching and learning. As a data scientist, I want to give a taste of possible new metrics and measurements based on annotation data. Finally, as a critical scholar I am hoping to explore how this new metrification and monitoring of reading might affect education. The talk will rely on data outlined in this essay: https://course-journals.lib.sfu.ca/index.php/pdc2018/article/view/240/213 https://csvconf.com/img/speakers-2019/aenkhbayar.jpg

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